#SCIENCE!!!
A blog for lovers of all things science, made by two students who are fascinated by all the scientific wonders of the universe. Daryl is pursuing a career in higher education and cell and molecular biology and Khris is a future coroner getting close to her M.D. Also feel free to ask us anything!
Reblogged from the-science-of-time  48 notes
fromquarkstoquasars:

First Ever Image of Orion (left) & Most Advanced Image Ever (right):Want to see how much technology has advanced in 100 years?Look no further…We recently posted an image of the Orion nebula across all our social media sites. This image compared the first ever photograph of Orion (taken in 1880) with an image taken in 2013 on an iPhone.Most people seemed to enjoy the comparison. However, there was a bit of a kerfuffle. Some people asserted that, to be accurate and fair, we should compare the most detailed image pf Orion with Draper’s image from 1880. Your wish is our command…. First ever image of Orion by Henry Draper in 1880 (left) and most detailed image of Orion ever taken (right). Image compiled by From Quarks to QuasarsRead more about this story at:http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/?p=28189

fromquarkstoquasars:

First Ever Image of Orion (left) & Most Advanced Image Ever (right):

Want to see how much technology has advanced in 100 years?
Look no further…

We recently posted an image of the Orion nebula across all our social media sites. This image compared the first ever photograph of Orion (taken in 1880) with an image taken in 2013 on an iPhone.

Most people seemed to enjoy the comparison. However, there was a bit of a kerfuffle. 

Some people asserted that, to be accurate and fair, we should compare the most detailed image pf Orion with Draper’s image from 1880. Your wish is our command…. 

First ever image of Orion by Henry Draper in 1880 (left) and most detailed image of Orion ever taken (right). Image compiled by From Quarks to Quasars

Read more about this story at:
http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/?p=28189

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

essayofthoughts:

indigoumbrella:

huffpostarts:

In The Not So Distant Future, Glow-In-The-Dark Trees Could Replace Street Lights

Is that… is that even healthy?

There are sea organisms and fungi which glow in the dark and there’s fireflies and jellyfish which glow in the dark. It doesn’t do them any harm nor does it do the people around them any harm. I would say its pretty healthy, as well as it would mean more photosynthesis happening in cities which mean cleaner air.

I was just curious about how they were doing it and for some reason I didn’t think to click the link. But thanks! It makes more sense now. I was afraid it was some kind of chemical thing.

nah just genetic modification using existing bioluminescent genes. Genetics is really cool, and so is bioluminescence. I mean they’ve already made pigs glow using jellyfish genes and pigs are waaay more complicated than trees iirc. So they’re actually (i think) less likely to muck it up with trees.

In which case

GLOWY

FORESTS

GLOWY

TREES

GLOWY

EVERYTHING

(I like glowy things)

What I Learned in Parasitology Is…

So since this science blog has gotten pretty slow as of late, (I know I owe someone an explanation of the physics of arrows and projectiles….. I really am getting around to that! Though by this point you probably did a google search… Sorry :C ) I’m going to do a once a week/bi-weekly web journal-y thingy I’m gonna call “What I Learned in Parasitology Is….”

This semester I’m taking a general Parasitology class as part as an organismal biology elective, and Parasitology is one area of animal biology that has always fascinated me since I knew what parasites were (which was around 5 or 6 years old when one of my dad’s old buddies came around looking for a place to crash for “a few days”).

The interesting thing about this Parasitology class that I’m taking this semester is that its the very first class of the subject offered at our university. Its being taught not by a Parasitology professor, per se, but an animal physiology professor whom has worked as a veterinarian for many years. He’s a very well respected member of the biology staff here at WCU, and I look forward to learning from him.

Anyway, this little web journal-y thingy I’ll be doing is just gonna be a few paragraphs about what we have learned in the class so far, some major points that I learned through the week, and GRATUITOUS AMOUNTS OF PICTURES THAT I WILL PROBABLY HAVE TO HAVE TRIGGER WARNINGS ON BECAUSE IF YOU’VE EVER LOOKED UP PARASITES IN GOOLE IMAGES YOU KNOW THAT STUFF IS NASTY.

The semester long project we have planned for this class includes me studying, and basically becoming an expert on, one interesting and uncommon parasite, so I’ll put alot of stuff about that on these posts too. 

Additionally, if you guys have some ideas for what I could do the project on, drop a message in the ask box and I’ll think it over! It does have to be both interesting and an uncommonly talked about parasite(so no botflies, toxoplasmosis, ring worms, tape worms, cordyceps, etc). 

I might also add in or substitute in interesting things from my other classes: Organic Chemistry, Biotechnology and Microbiology. 

I hope that those of you still tuning into this blog enjoy these upcoming posts, and as always - go team science!

Reblogged from asapscience  770 notes
theenergyissue:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks
Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

theenergyissue:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks

Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

Reblogged from shychemist  291 notes
shychemist:

“CHEMTRAILS”? REALLY? DID YOU FLUNK SCIENCE?

For the past few years, my Facebook page kept flagging strange websites that claimed that ordinary contrails formed by high-flying aircraft are “chemtrails,” a special kind of chemical sprayed on the unwitting population for reasons too bizarre and illogical to take seriously. For a long time, I’ve ignored this garbage on the internet, but in recent years it has gotten more and more pervasive, and I’ve run into people who believe it. There are whole shows about it on the once-scientific Discovery Channel, and the History Channel as well.
Now the chemtrail community circulates their photos and videos among themselves, put hundreds of these videos on YouTube, and on their own sites and forums. But the way the internet works as a giant echo chamber for weird ideas with no peer review, fact checking, or quality control, it’s getting impossible to ignore them any more, and it’s time to debunk it.
The first few times I heard about “chemtrails”, my reaction was “You can’t be serious.” But the people who spread this are serious. They are generally people who have already accepted the conspiracy theory mindset, where everything that they don’t like or don’t understand is immediate proof of some big government conspiracy. But there’s an even bigger factor at work here: gross science illiteracy. The first thing that pops in my mind reading their strange ideas is “Didn’t this person learn any science in school?” And the fastest rebuttal I give when I run into one of these nuts is: “Do you even understand the first thing about our atmosphere? Anything released at 30,000 feet will blow for miles away from where you see it, and has virtually no chance of settling straight down onto the people below, and be so diluted it would have no measurable amount of the chemical by the time it lands. That’s why crop-dusting planes must fly barely 30 feet off the ground so their dust won’t blow too far away from the crops!”
As Kyle Hill describes it:

If the chemtrail conspiracy were true, millions of pilots would be needed to crop dust the American population. A typical crop duster might use seven ounces of agent diluted in seven gallons of water to cover one acre of land. Chemtrail “people dusters” would use a similar concentration to cover the entire United States, just to be safe. For 2.38 billion acres of land, the pilots would then need—for just one week of spraying—120 billion gallons of these cryptic chemicals. That’s around the same volume as is transported in all the world’s oil tankers in one year. And such an incredible amount of agent would need an incredible number of planes. Considering that a large air freighter like a Boeing 747 can carry around 250,000 pounds of cargo, at the very least, the government would need to schedule four million 747 flights to spread their chemicals each week—eighteen times more flights per day than in the entire US.


Continue Reading.

shychemist:

“CHEMTRAILS”? REALLY? DID YOU FLUNK SCIENCE?

For the past few years, my Facebook page kept flagging strange websites that claimed that ordinary contrails formed by high-flying aircraft are “chemtrails,” a special kind of chemical sprayed on the unwitting population for reasons too bizarre and illogical to take seriously. For a long time, I’ve ignored this garbage on the internet, but in recent years it has gotten more and more pervasive, and I’ve run into people who believe it. There are whole shows about it on the once-scientific Discovery Channel, and the History Channel as well.

Now the chemtrail community circulates their photos and videos among themselves, put hundreds of these videos on YouTube, and on their own sites and forums. But the way the internet works as a giant echo chamber for weird ideas with no peer review, fact checking, or quality control, it’s getting impossible to ignore them any more, and it’s time to debunk it.

The first few times I heard about “chemtrails”, my reaction was “You can’t be serious.” But the people who spread this are serious. They are generally people who have already accepted the conspiracy theory mindset, where everything that they don’t like or don’t understand is immediate proof of some big government conspiracy. But there’s an even bigger factor at work here: gross science illiteracy. The first thing that pops in my mind reading their strange ideas is “Didn’t this person learn any science in school?” And the fastest rebuttal I give when I run into one of these nuts is: “Do you even understand the first thing about our atmosphere? Anything released at 30,000 feet will blow for miles away from where you see it, and has virtually no chance of settling straight down onto the people below, and be so diluted it would have no measurable amount of the chemical by the time it lands. That’s why crop-dusting planes must fly barely 30 feet off the ground so their dust won’t blow too far away from the crops!”

As Kyle Hill describes it:

If the chemtrail conspiracy were true, millions of pilots would be needed to crop dust the American population. A typical crop duster might use seven ounces of agent diluted in seven gallons of water to cover one acre of land. Chemtrail “people dusters” would use a similar concentration to cover the entire United States, just to be safe. For 2.38 billion acres of land, the pilots would then need—for just one week of spraying—120 billion gallons of these cryptic chemicals. That’s around the same volume as is transported in all the world’s oil tankers in one year. And such an incredible amount of agent would need an incredible number of planes. Considering that a large air freighter like a Boeing 747 can carry around 250,000 pounds of cargo, at the very least, the government would need to schedule four million 747 flights to spread their chemicals each week—eighteen times more flights per day than in the entire US.

Continue Reading.

fairysharkmother:

A message to any of Momma’s scared babies in the US:
Ebola will not infect you.
It cannot be caught through the air or through food or water.
It can only be caught if you are touching an infected person’s bodily fluids.
Even if a person has Ebola, but is not showing any symptoms, you will not catch it.
Calm down and do not fall prey to fear mongering.
Stay safe, and stay healthy!

fairysharkmother:

A message to any of Momma’s scared babies in the US:

Ebola will not infect you.

It cannot be caught through the air or through food or water.

It can only be caught if you are touching an infected person’s bodily fluids.

Even if a person has Ebola, but is not showing any symptoms, you will not catch it.

Calm down and do not fall prey to fear mongering.

Stay safe, and stay healthy!

Reblogged from currentsinbiology  139 notes
currentsinbiology:

Bad, bad parasite!!
A larva of a human botfly, Dermatobia hominis. The bands of retrorse teeth kept it well-anchored until surgically removed from the skin of its human host
Dr. Ward B. Strong
Vernon, British Columbia, Canada
Technique: Light microscopy with focal stacking

currentsinbiology:

Bad, bad parasite!!

A larva of a human botfly, Dermatobia hominis. The bands of retrorse teeth kept it well-anchored until surgically removed from the skin of its human host

Dr. Ward B. Strong

Vernon, British Columbia, Canada

Technique: Light microscopy with focal stacking